Terracotta Jewelry India – Ultimate Guide to the Sought After Jewelry Trends


Terracotta jewelry from India or clay jewelry is a distinct jewelry form originating from South Asia, particularly India, where large structures made out of terracotta clay still stand today, after centuries of existence. Ancient sculptures and structures, including figures of deities, temples, and pottery are only some of the most significant examples of terracotta art and creativity in India (such as West Bengal’s Bishnupur, Bribhu, Hooghly, and Murshidabad temples).

Indian terracotta jewelry is believed to have prehistoric origins, based on terracotta designs excavated from ancient archaeological sites like the Indus Valley Ciilization of Mohenjo-daro, which dates as far back as the 3000 – 1500 BC. Today, terracotta craft continues to be a thriving industry in India, with potters and craftsmen passing down their art and skill down several generations, hence carrying forth terracotta’s artistic legacy.

From their sculpture, temple-making, and pottery-making origins, terracotta is now a popular jewelry form and design. This exotic form of jewelry adds a boho-chic look to outfits. Terracotta jewelry from India is usually hand painted using earthy hues like greys, browns, greens, blues, reds, and yellows, which further add a rustic touch to pieces. Traditional designs and motifs come in the form of animals, human figurines, tribal gods, and other related images, shapes, and patterns. Modern designers, however, add a contemporary twist to pieces by making them into more diverse and unconventional shapes and forms as well as combining terracotta with other contemporary style materials like metals.

Terracotta jewelry designs can be as simple or as elaborate as you want them to be. They can be combined with all kinds of ethnic, semi-formal, formal, or even casual, everyday wear. Embellished earrings, jhumkas, pendants, bracelets, bangles, and rings in terracotta form are great accessories for classic Indian wear like anarkali kurtas, lehengas, and saris, among many other traditional pieces of clothing.